Australian Pain Society 32nd Annual Scientific Meeting
1 - 4 April 2012 | Melbourne Convention & Exhibition Centre, Victoria.
Integrated Perspective of Pain: People, Policies, Science Education
Countdown
Program/Speakers
Sponsors
Pre-Conference Workshop Sponsor
Mundipharma
Mundipharma
Breakfast Session Sponsor
Janssen
Janssen
Breakfast Session Sponsor
Mundipharma
Mundipharma
Breakfast Session Sponsor
Pfizer
Pfizer
Gold Sponsors
Janssen
Janssen
Gold Sponsors
Mundipharma
Mundipharma
Contact us

For further information please
contact the APS Secretariat:

DC Conferences Pty Ltd


Suite 103,  Level 1,  3-5 West Street, North Sydney NSW 2060, Australia


PO Box 637, North Sydney 2059


P   612 9954 4400   |   F   612 9954 0666


E   aps2012@dcconferences.com.au

Breakfast Sessions

Janssen Logo

"Motivating Patients"

How frustrated do you feel when patients are not motivated to adhere to your treatment plan?

Engaging with our patients to build their motivation for change is much easier said than done. Some patients simply fear change, while there are others who don’t believe change is even possible. But perhaps the most frustrating of all, are patients who enjoy certain aspects of their current lifestyle and just don’t want to change even though they understand the health consequences.

In this interactive and engaging workshop we provide a practical guide to patient motivation and show you how to implement the 5 key steps that build patient motivation and commitment for long-term change. 

Date: Monday 2 April
Time: 07.30am - 08.30am 



mundipharma
"TARGIN® tablets – Now there’s an opioid analgesic that helps prevent opioid-induced constipation (OIC)"

Presented by: Professor Stephan A. Schug
Chair of Anaesthesiology, Pharmacology and Anaesthesiology Unit, School of Medicine and Pharmacology, University of Western Australia  and Director of Pain Medicine, Royal Perth Hospital

TARGIN® tablets have been available in Australia since August 2010 and were listed on the PBS from 1st Dec 2011. TARGIN® tablets represents an improved standard of care in the management of moderate to severe chronic pain compared with oxycodone CR alone. Please join us at this breakfast session during which Prof Schug will provide information on how TARGIN® tablets work, outline key clinical data and will include discussions regarding aspects of Australian and European clinical experience to date.

Date: Monday 2 April
Time: 07.30am - 08.30am

 

"Can we limit the transition between acute to chronic pain?"

Chaired by: Professor Michele Sterling
Presented by: Professor Stephan A. Schug
Chair of Anaesthesiology, Pharmacology and Anaesthesiology Unit, School of Medicine and Pharmacology, University of Western Australia  and Director of Pain Medicine, Royal Perth Hospital

Severe chronic pain, often interfering significantly with quality of life and function, can occur after surgery and trauma. Most of the pain syndromes observed in this setting are of a neuropathic nature. It would be desirable to find methods to prevent the development of persistent postsurgical pain. The use of regional anesthesia and analgesia seems to be promising here, although the results are not completely consistent. With regard to pharmacological measure, not surprisingly the use of drugs, which have effects on central sensitization, has been successful; these are the NMDA receptor antagonist ketamine and alpha-2-delta ligands such as pregabalin.

For further reading:
Schug SA & Pogatzki-Zahn E. Chronic Pain after Surgery or Injury. Pain – Clinical Updates 2011: 19(1): 1-5


Date: Tuesday 3 April
Time: 07.30am - 08.30am


CSL

"CHANGE PAIN - Mechanism-oriented therapy: Three Perspectives
Speakers:
Professor Macdonald Christie (Professor of Pharmacology, University of Sydney)
Dr Stephen Leow (General Practitioner and Chair of National Network of Pain Management)
Associate Professor Stephanie Davies (Head of Service, Pain Medicine Unit, Fremantle Hospital)

‘The mechanisms involved in the experience of pain are many and complex.  Despite the considerable evidence base supporting a mechanism-oriented approach to pain management, the practical challenges of day-to-day patient care can sometimes get in the way.  This CHANGE PAIN symposium will engage the audience from the perspectives of basic science, primary care and the specialist setting, and explore the types of challenges faced by all involved with the management of pain patients.  Armed with a foundational basic science understanding of pain mechanisms, the audience will be encouraged to engage with the panel of experts and arrive at practical proposals that involve mechanism-oriented approaches to pain management and improved patient outcomes.’ 

Date: Tuesday 3 April
Time: 07.30am - 08.30am