DAYS TO GO

  • Mundipharma

    Mundipharma
  • Pfizer

    Pfizer
  • Seqirus A CSL Company (formerly bioCSL)

    Seqirus A CSL Company (formerly bioCSL)
  • iX Biopharma Ltd

    iX Biopharma Ltd
  • Mundipharma

    Mundipharma
  • Pfizer

    Pfizer
  • Seqirus A CSL Company (formerly bioCSL)

    Seqirus A CSL Company (formerly bioCSL)

2016 Australian Pain Society
36th Annual Scientific Meeting

2016 Australian Pain Society
36th Annual Scientific Meeting

APS BLOG LATEST POSTS

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Sponsored Sessions

Click on the following titles to read about each sponsored session:

Indivior - Monday Breakfast

Mundipharma - Monday Breakfast

iX Biopharma - Monday Afternoon

Seqirus - Tuesday Breakfast

Pfizer - Tuesday Breakfast

Monday 14 March 2016, 7.30 - 8.30 am


Opioid Prescription Painkillers - Experience and Treatment

Challenges in identification and diagnosis of opioid painkiller dependent patients.
- The topic of this discussion will cover issues with diagnosis of patients who developed dependence to opioid painkillers with emphasis on codeine containing painkillers.
- The need to be addressed is which classification to use for initial patient diagnosis.

Treatment options for opioid dependant painkiller patients: induction to the treatment.
- This topic will cover treatment needs and options for patients with opioid painkiller dependence, with an emphasis on induction period and dose adjustments required during induction.

Dr James Bell After training in internal medicine, Dr Bell specialized in Addiction Medicine. He was a leading figure in the development of training programs in Addiction, and in the achievement of specialty recognition of Addiction Medicine in Australia. He has held senior positions in Sydney and at the National Addiction Centre in London. His major research interest is in opioids and the management of opioid dependence. In the UK, he led a working group to improve management of pain in people with a history of opioid dependence.

  


Monday 14 March 2016, 7.30 - 8.30 am 

The use and unintended consequences of pharmaceutical opioids in Australia: How do we measure problematic use and what is the role of abuse deterrent formulations?

Chronic pain is one of the largest contributors to global disability. Effective treatments are of vital importance from an individual, societal and economic perspective. Currently, pain management relies heavily on pharmaceutical opioids, in line with their demonstrated efficacy for the short-term treatment of chronic cancer and non-cancer pain. Despite offering benefits, opioids carry risks such as abuse-liability and overdose potential. This presentation reviews current trends in pharmaceutical opioid utilisation, both globally and in Australia. It will discuss current concerns and new evidence on problematic use among people with chronic pain. Finally, it will discuss the role of abuse-deterrent formulations, and the impact of a specific potentially tamper-resistant formulation introduced in Australia.

Dr Briony Larance Briony is an NHMRC Australian Public Health Early Career Research Fellowship recipient and Research Fellow at the National Drug and Alcohol Research Centre (NDARC) at UNSW Australia. Her research focuses on understanding the trajectories and health consequences of pharmaceutical opioid use among diverse populations, including chronic pain patients and people who are opioid dependent and/or inject drugs. She has a particular interest in the extra-medical use of opioids and impact of abuse-deterrent formulations. She has been involved in epidemiological and clinical studies utilising a range of methods, including large-scale surveys of clinical populations, randomised-controlled trials, post-marketing surveillance of new opioid formulations, analyses of linked administrative data and cohort studies.

Monday 14 March 2016, 5.15 - 6.15 pm

Wafermine: Sublingual Ketamine as a New Option in Pain Management

Despite extensive use of ketamine in pain management, its optimal use remains to be determined.  The clinical scenarios in which ketamine can be given are constrained by the only licensed formulation being an injection.  Sublingual administration of ketamine by lozenges or rapidly dissolving sublingual wafers (Wafermine) can provide rapid onset of pain reduction.

In this evening’s talk, Professor Stephan Schug will summarise the literature on the use of ketamine in pain management, and describe his experience with sublingual ketamine lozenges. Professor Paul Rolan will then share the latest clinical trial data for Wafermine.

Professor Stephan Schug is currently the Professor and Chair of Anaesthesiology in the School of Medicine and Pharmacology at the University of Western Australia. He is also the Director of Pain Medicine at the Royal Perth Hospital, Australia, responsible for overseeing the Comprehensive Inpatient Pain Service, as well as a multi-disciplinary Pain Medicine Centre.  The latter has been accredited for training by the Faculty of Pain Medicine of the Australian and New Zealand College of Anaesthetists.
At the University of Cologne, Germany, Professor Schug studied Medicine, then went on to obtain his MD in clinical pharmacology. His main area of expertise lies in anaesthesia, intensive care and pain medicine, in particular on the treatment of patients in pain.
Professor Schug is a Scientific Advisor to iX Biopharma.  He also holds a position as Honorary Professor of Anaesthesiology at the University of Auckland, New Zealand. 

 

Professor Paul Rolan is a clinical pharmacologist and pain specialist whose career has spanned over 20 years, in both academic medicine and the pharmaceutical industry specialising in drug development.  His area of expertise is in pain management for migraine.  Professor Rolan is a Fellow of the Royal Australasian College of Physicians and a Fellow of the Faculty of Pain Medicine, Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Anaesthetists.  Until the end of 2014, Professor Rolan was the Professor of Clinical Pharmacology and Head of the School of Medical Sciences at the University of Adelaide.
As the Director of Drug Development at iX Biopharma, Professor Rolan is responsible for the development and implementation of clinical trial programmes.


Tuesday 15 March 2016, 7.30 - 8.30 am

 
Pain, perception & assessment is as individual as the patient

Over 3 million people in Australia suffer from chronic pain yet many patients do not achieve adequate pain relief. Chronic pain is a bio-psychosocial phenomenon that involves complex interactions between biological, psychological, social and cultural factors, which complicate its diagnosis and management. Response to treatment is individualised and the complexities of pain management highlight the importance of a multimodal approach. This symposium will explore an individualised approach to managing chronic pain and important outcomes for patients beyond a reduction in pain intensity.

Professor Eric VisserProfessor Eric Visser holds the Inaugural Churack Chair in Chronic Pain Education and Research at the University of Notre Dame Australia (UNDA) and St John of God Subiaco Hospital.
Professor  Visser is a pain medicine physician, anaesthesiologist and director at PainScienceWA, Joondalup Health Campus. He is also clinical senior lecturer in the School of Pharmacology and Anaesthesiology at the University of Western Australia (UWA).
Eric's wide-ranging interests include developing best- practice pain education systems, acute pain service applications and chronic post-surgical pain. 


Tuesday 15 March 2016, 7.30 - 8.30 am

 
Evidence-based treatment of neuropathic pain: The new NeuPSIG recommendations

This session will present an overview over current concepts in the treatment of neuropathic pain. It will illustrate, that commonly used analgesics such as paracetamol and NSAIDs/Coxibs do play no role in this setting.

In contrast, medications that “dampen down” peripheral sensitization (e.g. sodium channel blockers, “dampen down” central sensitization (e.g. NMDA-antagonists, calcium channel modulators (α-2-delta)) or “enhance” descending inhibitory pathways (e.g. tricyclics/SNRIs, tramadol, tapentadol) are effective.

The latest guidelines by the SIG Neuropathic Pain of the IASP are providing a clear hierarchy of useful medications (1). Specifically they list gabapentin and pregabalin, SNRIs such as duloxetine and venlafaxine and the tricyclic antidepressants as first line treatments. Second line treatments are tramadol and for topical neuropathic pain the 5% lidocaine, the 8% capsaicin patch and botulinum toxin. Strong opioids are listed as third line treatment due to the problems associated with their use.

It is of note that cannabinoids, discussed widely as a treatment option, received a weak recommendation against their use, reflecting data on relatively poor efficacy and increased risks.

Professor Stephan Schug is currently Professor and Chair of Anaesthesiology in the School of Medicine and Pharmacology at the University of Western Australia and Director of Pain Medicine at the Royal Perth Hospital, Australia. As Director of Pain Medicine, his clinical responsibilities include the running of a Comprehensive Inpatient Pain Service at two sites of this hospital as well as a multi-disciplinary Pain Medicine Centre, which is accredited for training by the Faculty of Pain Medicine of the Australian and New Zealand College of Anaesthetists.

For further information please contact the APS Secretariat: DC Conferences Pty Ltd
Suite 103, Level 1, 3-5 West Street, North Sydney NSW 2060, Australia | PO Box 637, North Sydney 2059
P 612 9954 4400 | F 612 9954 0666 | E aps2016@dcconferences.com.au